Being Present – The Danger of Not Just Enjoying the Moment

I seem to spend a great deal of time working with people who actively resist being in the present moment. Often much of their behaviour is unconscious, worrying about what might potentially be coming their way or what they might miss. Many of us seem to have lost the ability to consider the moment we are in, to savour and enjoy where we are just now. All we have is this very moment, nothing more is certain for any of us. Sometimes we can look back on something that had been an intense source of worry only to be amused at how little it really counted in the whole scheme of life so far.

Of course, my whole professional life is based on the consideration of what the past has brought forward. How we often carry hard childhood messages forward to adult life and I am aware of the need to understand erroneous messages and where they come from; but only to be able to put them to rest. Then we must consider where we are now, see it perhaps as a stepping off point and begin to build the life we desire whilst enjoying the moment we are in.

It would seem that our brains are becoming more and more wired to consider the ‘what if’ rather than considering the ‘what is’. We have our mobile phones near to hand delivering e mails and texts at a steady rate. How many times in a restaurant can you see phones on the table, its owner with half an eye on what might come through? I often wonder what conversations they are missing out on around the table and indeed how others feel not to have been given the undivided attention they might expect when sitting down to share a meal.

While ruminating on this, a dear client, admittedly a high achiever said that it was good to have all this at her finger tips for when she got bored. Absolutely, when you are sitting in a seminar and not feeling you are gaining any value from the speaker, it makes sense not to waste any time. But how, we discussed, will any of us know when it might have got interesting but we had already figuratively left the building. Remember the book you struggled to get into in the first few pages and then suddenly realised you could not put it down?

If we teach ourselves to only engage with what is immediately appealing do we risk creating an environment where the onus is on us all to be instantly engaging and interesting within the first few moments of contact with someone? And, oh dear, the outcome of not remaining entertaining! Surely this high expectation will be a target that will elude many and may encourage people to feel overwhelmed and retreat even further from older social interaction skills.

I am a fan of social media and believe it makes us all so much more accessible to each other, and where would we all be without e mail and texting, I can only wonder at how we all managed before. But we must always check our motives for being overly engaged in conversing too exclusively in this way. What might we be missing in this very moment?

How to perfectly roast a Thanksgiving turkey?

Whether you are dining in at home with family and friends, or going out for a meal for Thanksgiving, roast turkey is certainly the staple of the day. So how can you make the perfect roast turkey that would be the envy of all your dinner guests?

If you are going out for a meal, then it would no doubt be cooked by a professional chef, decked out in his or her fancy chef coat and apron (chefs prefer to wear hardy denim aprons for tasks such as these!), but how can you get the same taste and effect at home? Here are some tips from professional chefs on how to perfectly roast your Thanksgiving turkey.

The perfect turkey should be both well roasted, flavorsome and juicy as well, as well as being extremely aromatic., after all, it is the centerpiece of your Thanksgiving dinner table, right?

One piece of advice given by professional chefs is to plan out your cooking process early on, because you don’t want to overcook your bird as that would dry it out. Don’t forget to let it sufficiently thaw before you start your preparations, and this thawing time will need to be added to your timing for roasting the turkey.

A frozen store-bought turkey does not need brining, as it would simply be a waste of time, all you need to do is take it out of the packaging and dry it with some paper towels. Never wash a turkey or chicken because it causes contamination. Once your turkey is dry, rub seasoning and herb-butter all over it, so that the skin becomes nice and brown. Don’t forget that you should never cook the stuffing inside the turkey, but make it separately and then stuff the bird.

The bird should be kept on a low heat in the oven for approximately 5 hours, and you can keep checking it with a thermometer to see if it is cooked through. Once completely done, let it rest before serving.

Sales Training Ideas – Six Keys to a Powerful Sales Presentation

Six Keys to a Powerful Sales Presentation

1) Be interesting and to-the-point.

Your presentation needs to catch and keep the prospect’s attention and interest. Make it interactive. Ask the prospect questions and involve her in ways that make her an active member in the proposed solution. Use interesting examples and stories that mirror her situation and spell out how others have benefited from using you and your company in similar situations.

2) Deliver with energy, enthusiasm, and emotional logic.

You need to show energy, enthusiasm, and excitement for your product. At the same time, you don’t want to overwhelm the prospect withtoo much energy and excitement. If your prospect is a high-energy individual, match their energy level. If your prospect is more subdued, show energy and excitement that is one level above theirs.

In addition to showing energy and enthusiasm, you need to back your presentation up with logic. Remember: people buy on emotion and justify their decision on logic.

Bottom line on this point: Put life, energy, and enthusiasm in your voice, and make sure your sales presentation makes good logical sense.

3) Address the specific needs, desires, and concerns of the prospect, and speak to her hot buttons.

Each presentation will be different because each prospect has different needs, desires, and concerns. If you’ve done your work properly during previous calls, you understand what the prospect is looking for and you’ve uncovered some hot buttons. You will now educate the prospect on how your product or service fills her unique needs and desires. Show caring, understanding, and empathy for the prospect, and show that you are seriously interested in helping her out.

Make sure you focus on the benefits and what’s in it for the prospect. Features are fine, but you must articulate what those features mean to the prospect with regard to what is important to him or her.

4) Be clear, concise, and articulate.

Your sales presentation should be easy to understand, to the point, and it should be delivered in terms that the prospect will understand. You want to use as few words as possible while at the same time, using the most effective words possible. Also, no acronyms or other terms and phrases that the prospect may not be familiar with.

Finally, keep your initial presentation to a maximum of three solid points. If you overwhelm the prospect with more than three points, you will probably hear, “I want to think about it” and “send me some information.” If you have other legal items and disclosures that you have to cover, save those for the paperwork phase after the prospect has decided to buy.

5) Lead naturally to the close.

Your sales presentation should be designed in such a way that it walks the prospect smoothly through the presentation, addressing all needs and concerns, and flows right into the close. If your presentation is straight-forward, conversational, and covers all the bases, the close is simply the natural conclusion of the presentation.

6) Have a script.

While each presentation will be different based upon the individual prospect’s needs and desires, most of the pieces remain the same, you’ll simply use different ones and arrange them differently. Each feature and benefit, story, and piece of information you need to convey, must be well thought out, well prepared, written down, committed to memory, and most important, proven to work. Some people believe that having a written presentation is too unnatural-you may sound as though you are reading (if on the phone), or canned (if in person). The way to avoid this is by practicing, drilling, and rehearsing your presentation pieces to the point where you know them verbatim.

The goal of a script is to make sure you cover everything you need to cover in as few words as possible while at the same time, using the most effective words possible. Writing out each piece of your presentation and committing them to memory will ensure consistency throughout your presentation, it will also help identify any problems with your presentation.

Note: Don’t reinvent the wheel, get a presentation script from one of the top salespeople that you know works. You want their results, so use what they use.