Sales Training Ideas – Six Keys to a Powerful Sales Presentation

Six Keys to a Powerful Sales Presentation

1) Be interesting and to-the-point.

Your presentation needs to catch and keep the prospect’s attention and interest. Make it interactive. Ask the prospect questions and involve her in ways that make her an active member in the proposed solution. Use interesting examples and stories that mirror her situation and spell out how others have benefited from using you and your company in similar situations.

2) Deliver with energy, enthusiasm, and emotional logic.

You need to show energy, enthusiasm, and excitement for your product. At the same time, you don’t want to overwhelm the prospect withtoo much energy and excitement. If your prospect is a high-energy individual, match their energy level. If your prospect is more subdued, show energy and excitement that is one level above theirs.

In addition to showing energy and enthusiasm, you need to back your presentation up with logic. Remember: people buy on emotion and justify their decision on logic.

Bottom line on this point: Put life, energy, and enthusiasm in your voice, and make sure your sales presentation makes good logical sense.

3) Address the specific needs, desires, and concerns of the prospect, and speak to her hot buttons.

Each presentation will be different because each prospect has different needs, desires, and concerns. If you’ve done your work properly during previous calls, you understand what the prospect is looking for and you’ve uncovered some hot buttons. You will now educate the prospect on how your product or service fills her unique needs and desires. Show caring, understanding, and empathy for the prospect, and show that you are seriously interested in helping her out.

Make sure you focus on the benefits and what’s in it for the prospect. Features are fine, but you must articulate what those features mean to the prospect with regard to what is important to him or her.

4) Be clear, concise, and articulate.

Your sales presentation should be easy to understand, to the point, and it should be delivered in terms that the prospect will understand. You want to use as few words as possible while at the same time, using the most effective words possible. Also, no acronyms or other terms and phrases that the prospect may not be familiar with.

Finally, keep your initial presentation to a maximum of three solid points. If you overwhelm the prospect with more than three points, you will probably hear, “I want to think about it” and “send me some information.” If you have other legal items and disclosures that you have to cover, save those for the paperwork phase after the prospect has decided to buy.

5) Lead naturally to the close.

Your sales presentation should be designed in such a way that it walks the prospect smoothly through the presentation, addressing all needs and concerns, and flows right into the close. If your presentation is straight-forward, conversational, and covers all the bases, the close is simply the natural conclusion of the presentation.

6) Have a script.

While each presentation will be different based upon the individual prospect’s needs and desires, most of the pieces remain the same, you’ll simply use different ones and arrange them differently. Each feature and benefit, story, and piece of information you need to convey, must be well thought out, well prepared, written down, committed to memory, and most important, proven to work. Some people believe that having a written presentation is too unnatural-you may sound as though you are reading (if on the phone), or canned (if in person). The way to avoid this is by practicing, drilling, and rehearsing your presentation pieces to the point where you know them verbatim.

The goal of a script is to make sure you cover everything you need to cover in as few words as possible while at the same time, using the most effective words possible. Writing out each piece of your presentation and committing them to memory will ensure consistency throughout your presentation, it will also help identify any problems with your presentation.

Note: Don’t reinvent the wheel, get a presentation script from one of the top salespeople that you know works. You want their results, so use what they use.

How to Instantly Improve Your Next Presentation

Do you want to make sure your next presentation is as good as you can make it? This articles gives 7 ways to instantly improve your presentation so that you hold your audience’s interest, get your point across, and leave your audience wanting more.

1. Have one main point you can say in one sentence.

If you can’t describe your presentation’s main point in one sentence, your audience will likely not know what your point is either.

If possible, decide in advance what your point will be. But even if you’ve already prepared your talk, you can still choose a single point that pulls it all together.

If this article were a speech, the main point would be: You can instantly improve any presentation using these 7 simple techniques.

Ask yourself: If an 8-year-old asked you what your presentation was about, how would you answer them? Your answer is probably your main point. If you couldn’t give them an answer, spend a few more minutes quickly clarifying what your speech is all about. It’s the single best step you can take to improve your presentation.

2. Give structure to your presentation to make it easier to follow.

When we listen to a presentation, we don’t know what’s coming next unless the speaker tells us. We can’t know the next word or the next sentence. Unlike an article reader, your audience can’t glance ahead to see where you’re going. They also can’t re-read a paragraph they missed because if they do, they won’t hear what you say next.

What’s the solution?

Give them a structure they can follow. The classic outline is to “tell them what you’re going to tell them, tell them, and then tell them what you told them.”

But here are other ways to add structure to your talk:

Use chronological order: first, next, last; or past, present, and future. Talk about problems, solutions, and results. Focus on priorities, going from most important to least. Compare myths and reality. Use a familiar analogy where the parts of your talk correspond, such as the roots, trunk, and leaves of a tree. These are just a few ways to add structure to make your presentations easier to follow.

3. Ask questions that engage the audience.

One of the best ways to improve a presentation is to involve the audience. Instead of talking to them or at them, turn it into a conversation. One of the easiest ways to do this is to ask questions.

Asking questions gets people thinking and responding to you, at least inside their minds. With a small audience you may ask a few people to raise their hands or call out their answers. But even with 1,000 people you can ask questions and have 1,000 people coming up with answers in their own minds. Each will engage in their own inner conversation with you.

4. Speak as though you are talking to one person.

If you have ever heard a speaker who seemed to talk directly to you, it’s probably because they were. Even if you didn’t notice it, they probably always spoke as though they were one-on-one with each member of the audience.

How can you do this when you’re standing in front of dozens or even hundreds of people? You never address the group as a whole. You don’t say, “Everyone here…” or “all of you…” You say everything as though you were speaking to one person. This is a subtle but powerful difference.

5. Speak in short sentences.

If you want to drastically improve how well your audience pays attention and understands what you say, speak in shorter sentences than usual. Many of us tend to ramble a bit. In natural conversation, it’s common to use run-on sentences linked together with the words “and,” “so,” “or,” or “but.” Force yourself to use shorter sentences. This will make it much easier for your audience to stay with you. And it will also keep you from losing track of where you were going with your sentence. You will communicate more clearly.

6. Add variety to your voice.

Many speakers, especially men, talk with a monotone when they give presentations. They are either nervous or so focused on covering the content that they forget to speak with variety.

The solution is to pay special attention to adding vocal variety when you speak. One technique is to imagine that you are reading a children’s story. Use that same kind of variety that comes naturally when reading a story. Another approach is to pretend you are talking to a friend about something you are excited or feel strongly about. Give your voice some color and your audience will appreciate it–and they will stay much more interested.

7. Tell stories and give examples.

People love stories as long as they are relevant. You can improve your next presentation dramatically by adding a story or two that illustrates your points. I remember a time when I was speaking to a group of teachers, and I told them how my first grade teacher had changed my life by encouraging my parents to get help for my speech impediment. As a result, I speak without any impediment even though I was barely understandable when I started first grade.

That’s an example of using a story to create more interest and engagement.

Start adding stories to your presentations and your audiences will perk up and take interest. And if they don’t remember anything else you say, they will remember your stories.

Presentation Skills: What Is Your Message?

When you are preparing a presentation, one of the first things to do is to focus on your message.

Think of your message as the one thing you’d like the audience to remember from your presentation. State it in one sentence, if you can – think of it as fitting on a headline of a newspaper or a billboard.

What’s the one thing stated, succinctly, in one sentence, that you’d like the audience to take away from your presentation? Whether you are talking for ten minutes or an hour, what would you like the audience to remember?

If we were to interview the audience after your presentation and ask, “What was the point of that presentation? What was the message?” would they all say the same thing? They may describe it using different words, but in essence, it should be the same content.

We’d want them to say, “Well, the point of that was to understand the three reasons for not moving ahead with this project now.” Or,”Well, the purpose of that presentation was so he could explain his management philosophy, and how he’s going to lead the team.” Or, “The purpose of that was to explain the first quarter numbers, and why they are not as good as we expected.”

So before you start putting together your material, your outline, and your slides, it’s important for you to be clear on your message. State it in one or two sentences and write it on the top of your notes or outline.

Because, if you’re not clear about exactly what you’re trying to communicate, it’s going to be very difficult for the audience to understand it.